Tuesday, February 10, 2009

LEARJET


1964–95


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Learjet 25D
STANDARD DATA: (24E) Seats 6-8. Gross wt. 12,499. Empty wt. 7,025. Fuel capacity 715. Engines two 2,950-lb. s.t. General Electric turbojets.
PERFORMANCE: Top mph 534. Cruise mph 507. Stall mph 101. Initial climb rate 7,220. Ceiling 45,000. Range 1,455. Balanced field length 3,000.
STANDARD DATA: (24F) Seats 6-8. Gross wt. 13,500. Empty wt. 7,130. Fuel capacity 840. Engines two 2,950-lb. s.t. General Electric turbojets.
PERFORMANCE: Top mph 534. Cruise mph 507. Stall mph 101. Initial climb rate 7,100. Ceiling 51,000. Range 1,695. Balanced field length 3,297.
STANDARD DATA: (25D) Seats 8-10. Gross wt. 15,000. Empty wt. 7,640. Fuel capacity 910. Engines 2,950-lb. s.t. General electric turbojets.
PERFORMANCE: Top mph 534. Cruise mph 507. Stall mph 107. Initial climb rate 6,300. Ceiling 51,000. Range 1,765. Balanced field length 3,937.

 iad
Learjet 36A
STANDARD DATA: (25F) Seats 6-8. Gross wt. 15,000. Empty wt. 7,575. Fuel capacity 1,103. Engines two 2,958-lb. s.t. General Electric turbojets.
PERFORMANCE: Top mph 534. Cruise mph 507. Stall mph 107. Initial climb rate 6,300. Ceiling 51,000. Range 1,910. Balanced field length 3,937.
STANDARD DATA: (35A) Seats 6. Gross wt. 17,300. Empty wt. 9,110. Fuel capacity 931. Engines two 3,500-lb. s.t. AiResearch turbofans.
PERFORMANCE: Top mph 534. Cruise mph 507. Stall mph 110. Initial climb rate 4,900. Ceiling 45,000. Range 2,785. Balanced field length 4,224.
STANDARD DATA: (36A) Seats 6. Gross wt. 18,300. Empty wt. 9,154. Fuel capacity 1,110. Engines two 3,500-lb. s.t. AiResearch turbofans. PERFORMANCE: Top mph 534. Cruise mph 507. Stall mph 110. Initial climb rate 4,525. Ceiling 45,000. Range 3,285. Balanced field length 4,784.

By name, the LearJet is probably the most recognized private jet in the world. Indeed, the name is almost synonymous with executive jet aircraft. The first model 23 was delivered in 1964 with seating for eight. Two  years later, the improved model 24 with airline transport category certification was introduced, and in 1968, a stretched 10-seat model 25 was offered. This aircraft has the most exceptional climb rate in its class. The model 23 at gross weight will climb at 6,900 fpm. All Learjets are approved for operation at 45,000 feet, and they have much better short-field performance than is common in this category of aircraft. One reason for the climb and takeoff advantage is weight: The model 23, which needs only 2,300 feet to clear a 50-foot obstacle at gross-weight takeoff, weighs only 6,500 pounds empty and grosses at 12,500 pounds. It can fly at 26,000 feet with one engine inoperable.

Models include the 24E with seats for six to eight and featuring a short balanced field length of 2,590 feet. The 24F has the same accommodations as the 24E but with a larger gross weight by 1,001 pounds. The 25D offers seating for eight to 10 and a 15,000-pound gross weight. The 25F with the same 15,000 gross
weight has provisions for fewer passengers to allow for a greater fuel load. The 35A is a transcontinental version with a 17,000-pound maximum takeoff weight and a 2,858-mile range. The transoceanic 36A features a farther than 2,000-mile range and an 18,000-pound weight when fully loaded.

The 24- and 25-series models are powered by General Electric turbojets with 2,950 lbs. s.t. for takeoff. The 35A and 36A are outfitted with 3,500-lb. s.t. Garrett AiResearch turbofan engines; the 55, 55ER, and 55LR are all powered by two 3,700-lb. s.t. Garrett AiResearch turbofans and can carry 1,001 gallons of fuel for ranges up to 3,003 miles.

All models feature a new modified wing design to reduce approach speeds and balanced field length without sacrificing Mach cruise and range. In conjunction with the Dee Howard Co., Gates Learjet developed a new 20-series model with extended range capabilities, the Century III 25G. The 30-series has its takeoff weight
increased by 300 pounds and its landing weight boosted by 1,000 pounds. The TBO for the 20-series General Electric engine was increased from 4,000 to 5,000
hours.



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