Monday, February 22, 2010

Visit The 747 Wing House With MotoArt


Plane & Pilot recently joined the MotoArt team (Donovan Fell III, Dave Hall and Ramona Cox) on a tour of the 747 Wing House in Malibu, Calif. “I like the idea of using trash for something useful,” owner Francie Rehwald explained to us. The idea for her unusual (and extreme!) home was first conceived when she asked architect David Hertz to base a design on this principal. He suggested that they recycle an airliner. The result? A Boeing 747 dream home made from post-consumer waste that reflects Rehwald’s passion for recycling.

Rehwald and Hertz located a Boeing 747-200 (28th off the line for Pan Am, then flown by Tower Air), which had been retired to the California desert. The aircraft was cut into sections, and the wings were transported to Camarillo Airport by trucks that were specially rigged to accommodate the long and tall load. In June 2008, the wings were airlifted by Chinook to the homesite in the Malibu hills. Rehwald paid $40,000 for the aircraft, but the total labor cost for transporting it reached $100,000 (which included $8,000 per hour of Chinook time).

The house, a mix of concrete, aluminum and heavy-duty glass, is designed as a multi-level structure built to fit the hilly terrain. The 747 wings, which measure 125x45x7 feet, serve as the rooftops of the residence that also includes a separate guest wing. The two stabilizers make up the roof for Rehwald’s master bedroom.

Rehwald’s 55 acres offer panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean and Channel Islands, and are fenced in by Marston mat, perforated steel originally used to pave airfields during World War II. The property, once owned by Hollywood designer Tony Duquette, is decorated with several pagodas made with recycled material. Mixed in with the industrial feel of the airliner is a serenity marked by these meditation pavilions, winding dirt trails, organic gardens and even a bocce court.

Rehwald hopes to inspire others to consider alternate uses for the materials they throw away. The estimated completion date for her Wing House is mid-2010. Visit her architect's website for more information.

Click on the thumbnails to view full-size images with captions. Use the right arrow button to cycle through the entire gallery.

Wing House owner Francie Rehwald hopes to inspire others to consider alternate uses for the materials they throw away.
Donovan Fell III and Dave Hall of MotoArt with Wing House owner Francie Rehwald.
The 747 wings and stabilizers were transported to the site via Chinook in June 2008. Estimated completion is mid-2010.
The 747 stabilzers will serve as roof for the master bedroom.
All airplane structures and supporting concrete are in place. Any remaining spaces will be filled with heavy-duty glass.
Donovan Fell III of MotoArt
"You want to do what?!"
Rehwald's request of architect David Hertz was "Emphasize curves." She wanted to add femininity to the structure
The house is designed as a multi-level structure built to fit the topography.
The final house will be a mix of concrete, aluminum and high-performance glass.
The 747-200 wing measures 125 x 45 x 7 feet.
The property's fence is constructed of Marston mat, formerly used to pave airfields during World War II.
A detail of the Marston matting used by Rehwald to enclose her 55-acre property.
Fuselage windows will connect a gourmet kitchen to the dining area.
"I like the idea of using trash for something useful," says owner Rehwald.
The 747 wings are supported by steel posts.
Francie Rehwald with MotoArt and Plane & Pilot.
Ramona Cox, aka "Skychick".
Francie consults with the MotoArt on perfecting her airliner home.
Dave Hall is king of the world!
Jessica Ambats atop a 747 wing, which offers views of the Pacific Ocean, Channel Islands and Camarillo Airport
The property is decorated with structures built by the previous owner, designer Tony Duquette.
The 55-acre Malibu property features a bocce court.
Abalone from Cayucos Abalone Farm will be crushed and used to frame the fireplace inside the Wing House.
Mixed in with the industrial feel of the airliner is a serenity marked by meditation pavillions.




1 Comment

Add Comment