3 thoughts on “CESSNA 336/337 “SKYMASTER”/ “PRESSURIZED SKYMASTER”

  1. Novel for US makers, but not worldwide. Dornier was making centerline-thrust twins back in the 1920s and they still make them today. One advantage they have is that both engines share two common planes (dimensionally) rather than having a higher engine in back like the Mixmaster. The vertical stagger produces some weird vibrations that tend to loosen nuts & bolts quicker. Adam Aircraft had the same problem. Dornier didn’t always get it right, but they got it right with their current Seastar. I often wish the US makers would follow suit because it’s a great concept that just needs proper execution.

  2. John, no doubt your achievements in the aviation industry are legendary, so much in fact you are justified in calling it the Mixmaster. Your engineering notes on the “weird vibrations” are impressive! I particularly love how you compare the highly successful 337 to the Seastar (A Multi pass 1000hp seaplane) …LOL!!!

  3. John, no doubt your achievements in the aviation industry are legendary, so much in fact you are justified in calling it the Mixmaster. Your engineering notes on the “weird vibrations” are impressive! I particularly love how you compare the highly successful 337 to the Seastar (A Multi pass 1000hp seaplane) …LOL!!!

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