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Wreckage Of Missing Alaskan Floatplane Found

The plane was discovered after nine years and dozens of searches

The wreckage of a Cessna 182E floatplane, discovered last week in steep, forested terrain on Admiralty Island, Alaska, has been identified. The plane, along with the two people on board—Brian and Brandon Andrews—went missing on August 9, 2008, on a short flight from Young Lake (Admiralty Island) to Juneau. Both Brian, 56 at the time, and his son, Brandon, 24, were pilots and very familiar with the route they were flying. The flight from Young Lake to Juneau generally takes around 20 minutes.

Courtesy of the Alaska State Troopers

The aircraft was originally reported missing shortly after it was due in Juneau by B.J. Andrews, Brian’s elder son. Brian, B.J., and Brandon had been at the family’s cabin on Young Lake for a camping trip. Brian and Brandon flew B.J. and the family’s two dogs back to Juneau before returning to Young Lake to collect the rest of their camping gear. The lack of supplies at the campsite led authorities conclude that the plane had likely run into trouble on its return trip. Over the last nine years, dozens of searches have been conducted on foot, in the air, and on water. Until last week’s discovery, no sign of the aircraft or its occupants had been found.

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The wreckage was discovered by a hunting party. The aircraft was identified by matching serial numbers on the airframe and engine block with the missing aircraft’s records. Identification was confirmed by the NTSB. Early reports are that it appears as though all on board were killed on impact. It’s way too early for the cause of the accident to be determined, but the investigation has been resumed.


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