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Cross-Country Flying Stories

Cross-country flying stories from Bill Cox offer fantastic insight into what pilots face on long distance flights. Dig into our X-Country Log today.

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

The Evolution Of Navigation

Flying from A to Z is no longer as simple as it used to be. It’s simpler.

The Evolution Of NavigationFor better or worse, I learned to fly in the days when there were still A-N ranges up and running, not many, but a few.
Tuesday, October 19, 2010

For The Birds

Birds have more to teach us than we could ever learn

For The BirdsI’ve been an accidental student of ornithology for as long as I’ve been alive—and that’s a long time.
Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Artificial Speed

Believe it or not, there are some easy, inexpensive ways to fly faster

Artificial SpeedIt’s probably the most common question I hear at air shows and conventions such as Sun ’n Fun, AirVenture, AOPA, NBAA and Reno.
Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Memories Of The Swift

My first airplane was a Swift—and I survived

Memories Of The SwiftOkay, right up front, in an attempt to stop short any angry letters from Swift owners, I loved my little Swift.
Tuesday, July 20, 2010


Vne doesn’t necessarily mean what you think it means

Redline!I was flying home to California from Florida in my Mooney Executive a few years ago following what amounted to a medium makeover of the airplane’s aerodynamic drag signature.
Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Zen & The Art Of Airplane Flying

Airplanes and motorcycles may be more alike than you think

Zen & The Art Of Airplane FlyingI’m one of those apparently strange folks who believe that flying is an easy skill to learn. No, that’s not because I do it so well.
Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Memories Of Alaska

The Far North is one of the most popular vacation destinations for pilots

Memories Of AlaskaOnce or twice each summer, I slip into the right seat of an airplane and help a pilot fly to an exotic destination, most often across the Atlantic from North America to Europe.
Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Stamp Out CFIT

Truth is, not everybody learns from their mistakes

Stamp Out CFITIt was mid-1977, and I had been assigned a story on the first production model of a new twin.
Tuesday, March 23, 2010

What’s Up With WAAS?

WAAS is the third generation of GPS, and it makes all the difference

What’s Up With WAAS?I was fortunate to discover GPS early on. I was on my way to the 1991 Paris Air Show in the one and only prototype Swearingen SJ30 business jet, and had stopped for fuel in Greenland.
Tuesday, February 23, 2010

To Korea, With Luck

Four legs, 52 flight hours in one of the world’s most comfortable—and slowest—turboprops

To Korea, With LuckMy buddy Jeff Kopps of the National Weather Service in Monterey, Calif., had predicted headwinds out of Santa Barbara, and as usual, he was right.
Tuesday, January 26, 2010

When Slower Is Better

The whole point of most airplanes is speed—except during landings

When Slower Is BetterContrary to sometimes misinformed opinion, a Mooney is one of the easier airplanes to land.
Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Caravan To Seoul—The Prequel

Here’s what happens before you fly the ocean

Caravan To Seoul—The PrequelIf you saw Jurassic Park, then you may remember the scene where Jeff Goldblum describes chaos theory as a mathematical discipline where the results of any given problem are never totally predictable, no matter how carefully conditions are controlled.
Tuesday, October 20, 2009

The Paranoia Of Landings

Landings aren’t the most important thing, they’re the only thing—not

The Paranoia Of LandingsI had been hired to fly a Cessna 340 from Torrance, Calif., to Glasgow, U.K., on an Atlantic tour with the owner in the right seat. The first four days of the trip had gone well. We had departed Torrance, stopped in Denver and made it to Ohio the first day, then managed to have lunch in Bangor and fly on to Goose Bay the second day.
Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Pilots N Paws

Here’s a way for pilots to help save the lives of some of our best friends

Pilots N PawsLike many of you, I’ve owned dogs for as long as I can remember, probably longer.
Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Ferry Flying As A Career?

It’s not the glamorous life everyone thinks it is

Ferry Flying As A Career?I receive more e-mail and snail mail from readers about ferry flying than on all other subjects combined.
Tuesday, July 28, 2009

From Hero To Bum—Almost

You can learn from your mistakes…if you can just survive them

From Hero To Bum—AlmostIt was January 1989, and I had just delivered a new Grand Caravan to Comair in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Dodging The Tornados

“Oh, by the way, could you drive a new T182 back from Lakeland, Fla., to Long Beach, Calif.?”

Dodging The TornadosThere are worse jobs in aviation. It was during the last two days of Sun ’n Fun 2009 that I got the call from Tom Jacobson of Tom’s Aircraft in Long Beach.
Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Singapore By Bonanza

Flying a Bonanza to Singapore offers an education in “managing” thunderstorms

x-countryHe was a regular reader of this space and he called a while back wondering if I’d be interested in ferrying his pristine A36TC Bonanza from El Monte, Calif., to Singapore. Gee, lemme think about that for 30 seconds.
Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Traveling By “Corporate” Airplane

A local breakfast flight emphasizes the value of corporate aviation

Traveling By “Corporate” AirplaneI’ve owned personal airplanes almost since I earned my pilot’s license 43 years ago. I didn’t buy my first airplane, a Globe Swift, specifically for business (in fact, I don’t recall ever flying it in conjunction with a story), but most of the half-dozen airplanes I’ve owned since have been employed primarily in pursuit of profit.
Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Why Retract?

To retract or not to retract? That is the question.

Why Retract?My first airplane was a retractable, but it was sometimes hard to tell. It was a purely stock 1946 Globe Swift GC1B, and while the main wheels would retract—eventually—there often seemed to be little effect on performance. Though the airplane was a cute little devil and a fairly primo example of its kind, its performance was a country mile behind the “book.”