Thursday, April 1, 2010

April 2010


Essentials of Advanced Composite Fabrication & Repair by Louis C. Dorworth, Ginger L. Gardiner and Greg M. Mellema (ASA, 2010, ISBN: 9781560277521). This handbook provides a thorough guide to composite terminology. It breaks materials down into their constituents and offers details about design guidelines, various tooling concepts, manufacturing methods and accepted repair theories. Order at www.asa2fly.com.
Yesterday We Were in America: Alcock and Brown—First to Fly the Atlantic Non-Stop by Brendan Lynch (Haynes Publishing, 2009, ISBN: 9781844256815). This engaging account of one of the most remarkable feats in aviation history draws on eyewitness accounts, Alcock and Brown’s written records, and an interview with the late Steve Fossett, who re-created the flight in 2005.
   
Say Again, Please: Guide to Radio Communications by Bob Gardner (ASA, 2010, ISBN: 9781560277606). Talking on the radio and understanding ATC instructions can be very intimidating. Learn what to say, what you’ll hear, and how to interpret and react to clearances and instructors. Order at www.asa2fly.com.  
A Hundred Feet Over Hell: Flying With the Men of the 220th Recon Airplane Company Over I Corps and the DMZ, Vietnam 1968–1969 by Jim Hoooper (Zenith, 2009, ISBN: 9780760336335). Forward air controllers in Vietnam may have had the war’s most dangerous aviation role. They flew prop planes low over deadly battlefields, scouting enemy movements and providing prebattle support. This is the story of the Catkillers, who operated in the northernmost combat zone in South Vietnam.
AMARG: America’s Military Aircraft Boneyard by Nicholas A. Veronico and Ron Strong (Specialty Pr Pub, 2010, ISBN: 9781580071390). The country’s largest military aircraft storage center began as a small desert site holding bombers and transports in reserve. It later became a place for salvage and parts recovery and, in many cases, a final aircraft resting place. This book includes photos of the 4,000 stored planes and a detailed appendix of the aircraft types currently at AMARG.




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