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Flight Training

Our flight-training articles can help you become a better pilot. From getting a license in two weeks to advance flying techniques, our pilot training for general aviators cover all the information you need.

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Learning To Fly 2.0: Cooler, Safer And More Fun Than Ever


Big changes in technology, manufacturing and design have changed the way we learn to fly



Learning To Fly 2.0:  Cooler, Safer And More Fun Than EverImagine it: You’re training for night cross-country flying. The evening is moonless VFR. Your weather briefing says your route is clear. The synthetic vision feature of your glass instrument panel displays everything—including the runway centerline—as if illuminated on a clear day.
Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Kings Of The Sky


Spend a day with John and Martha King and the hotly anticipated Cessna Skycatcher



Kings Of The Sky"So what are they like in person?” is the first question my pilot friends ask when I tell them I’ve spent a day with John and Martha King, the well-known founders of King Schools.
Monday, November 2, 2009

The Checkride Chronicles


A year in the life of a designated pilot examiner



The Checkride ChroniclesWho’s the judge beside you in the cockpit, deciding whether you’re worthy of receiving aviation’s highest honor (a license to learn)? Hopefully, it’s someone who’ll make your entry into the world of aviation less than turbulent.
Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Sporty’s Foundation: The Future Of Aviation


One child at a time, Hal Shevers and his foundation are keeping aviation alive



Sporty’s Foundation: The Future Of AviationIf we don’t get more young people interested in every aspect of general aviation, it will simply disappear as we know it,” Hal Shevers, the founder and chairman of Sporty’s Pilot Shop, tells me as he punctuates his sentence with a long pause and his piercing eyes.
Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Ticket To Ride III


Part III: Don’t get cocky, kid—You’ve soloed. Time to prep for The Ride!



Ticket To Ride IIIRight after soloing in 860LS, the lovely Flight Design CTLS, I feel light as a cloud.
Monday, May 11, 2009

Ticket To Ride II


Part II: Practice, practice, practice, home study, and what? Time to solo already? Gulp.



ticket to rideIn our April 2009 issue, Jim Lawrence launched the first in his series of articles about LSA training in a Flight Design CTLS. This month, he takes us through solo.
Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Looking For 200 Knots


Forty years ago, the goal was 200 mph. Today, it’s 200 knots.



knottsFast feels good. For those of us obsessed with clocking along at the velocity of a Lamborghini, speed is the kinesthetic equivalent of beauty.
Tuesday, April 21, 2009

From Cirrus To Citation


JetAviva puts its clients into the left seat of light jets



From Cirrus To CitationThrough my Lightspeed Zulu headset, I hear a confident voice: “Denver Center, Citation One Three Zulu Mike, vacating flight level 390 for 240, smooth ride.”
Tuesday, April 7, 2009

TransPac Aviation Academy


Drawing from its Pan Am training heritage, TransPac positions itself for the future



transpac academyTradition goes a long way in aviation. A rich history aloft is respected and admired, whether it applies to pilots, aircraft or—in the world of ab initio training—flight academies. With its legacy steeped in the fabled lore of one of the greatest airlines in history, Pan Am International Flight Academy is long on tradition and legacy.
Tuesday, April 7, 2009

Weather In The Cockpit


XM Weather provides real-time information in the cockpit for pilots who are serious about their weather decisions



weather in the cockpitAsk most pilots what subject in aviation they wish they knew more about, and a majority will answer, “weather.” Indeed, while forecasters do occasionally still get it wrong, and even the best meteorologists acknowledge that we still have much to learn, the science of weather prognostication improves each year.
Tuesday, April 7, 2009

The Right Way To The Left Seat


How to realize your dream of becoming a professional pilot



the right way to the left seatFlying is in the blood of certain individuals. Some of us plan a career in the cockpit from an early age, and we pursue it to the exclusion of everything else. Others keep their aviation goals quietly smoldering, always on a back burner ready to emerge at the right time. For various reasons, they may alight in a different direction, attain career goals outside of aviation and pursue vocational paths that seem far detached from flying. But many of them come back.
Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Ticket To Ride


Earning a sport pilot license: Part I



ticket to rideEnough trash already. This endless washboard-road turbulence promises to reintroduce me to the hot dog and greasy fries I just ate. Note to self: Next time, have an avocado salad.
Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Sport Pilot Daze


What’s up with the light-sport ticket, and what/where/when can I fly with it?



sport pilot dazeBehold the rapidly beating heart of light-sport aviation: A YouTube video chronicles a pilot’s dead-stick takeoff. Not landing...takeoff. He points his engine-off LSA down a 35-degree mountain slope, rolls into a hang glider–style launch and lands—still dead stick—on a sandbar 1,500 feet below and two miles away.
Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Learn To Fly: Fun Things You Can Do With Your Certificate


Flying an airplane is an unmatched experience, and you can do some amazing things once you earn your certificate



learn to flyAh, if only you knew how to fly! You could escape the shackles of your humdrum life and soar above its stresses. You could wake up in Nebraska, eat a cheeseburger for lunch in Colorado and settle in for the night on a crystal lake in Idaho. You could fly biplanes or jets or spiffy little yellow Cubs with smiling bears painted on their tails. But how much will it cost, how long will it take and how safe is it? What can you do with a pilot’s license?
Monday, June 23, 2008

Wingipedia, Part III


In our final installment, we conclude with “Alberto Santos-Dumont” through “Zulu time”



WingipediaWe’ve finally reached the end, my friends. In “Wingipedia, Part I” [March 2008], we covered “acrobatics through “induced drag.” And in “Part II” [May 2008], we took care of “Jenny” through “roll.” It has been fun, but our aviation version of Wikipedia has reached the end of its line. Wikipedia, which asserts that its name is “a portmanteau of the words wiki (a type of collaborative website) and encyclopedia,” is an online encyclopedia that’s written and edited by its visitors, i.e., people like you and me.
Thursday, May 1, 2008

Wingipedia, Part II


In this edition, “Jenny” through “roll”



wingipediaLast month, we brought you the first installment (“acrobatics” through “induced drag”) of Wingipedia, our aviation-based encyclopedia. Here, we present the second installment. If you think that something’s missing, log on to planeandpilotmag.com to contribute your own additions.
Thursday, May 1, 2008

Pilot Careers 2008


Get inside the cockpit



careersOpportunities for professional pilots are at record levels for civilian aviators. No matter what your goal, if you work hard, fly well, present yourself professionally and are flexible with schedules and work locations, chances are extremely good that you’ll find a professional pilot seat waiting for you.
Saturday, March 1, 2008

Wingipedia


In this edition, "acrobatics" through "induced drag"



wingipediaThe computer generation has come to depend on digital explanations for everything courtesy of Wikipedia (and, no, we don’t know where the name came from). That being the case, we thought we’d come up with our own, more common sense, aviation-based encyclopedia, hence “Wingipedia.” If you think something’s missing, add your two cents through the link at the end of this article.
Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Greasing It On


Smooth handling: some advice on how to make every landing a squeaker



Greasing It OnOn any given flight, the landing is the maneuver that concerns pilots the most. It concerns the pilot because, when it comes to aircraft handling, the takeoff is pretty simple, and once in the air, controlling the aircraft is far less complicated than driving a car in traffic. Nevertheless, at the end of every flight is the dreaded landing. Every professional pilot has found his or her techniques for a smooth landing. A perfect landing every time under all ground and wind conditions isn’t easily obtainable or necessary for a safe flight.

Thursday, March 1, 2007

Test Yourself


Let’s play the Practical Test Standards Game again



Test YourselfThere’s a wonderful line in a Toby Keith song that laments, “I’m not as good as I once was, but I’m as good once as I ever was.” It’s a bar room tale complaining about the aging process and the awful fact that it can’t be stopped. Luckily, that’s not necessarily true of pilots. Flying isn’t about party stamina but about skill, and that doesn’t have to slide downhill just because time is passing—assuming, of course, a pilot wants to halt that erosion.

 

 

 

Thursday, March 1, 2007

Learn To Fly: Solo At 14


A 14-year-old boy, trained in Compton, solos both a helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft!



Learn To FlyIf anyone thinks that they can’t do what they put their mind to, they should meet Jonathan Strickland. Like any typical teenager, his vocabulary gravitates toward words such as “yeah” and “cool.” But what sets him apart from the rest is quite extraordinary. Jonathan can’t drive a car yet, but he can fly both an airplane and a helicopter!

 

Thursday, February 1, 2007

Earning A Tailwheel Endorsement


Andover Flight Academy’s stick and rudder training brings out the bush pilot in everyone



Earning A Tailwheel EndorsementIt’s still an airplane,” insisted Damian DelGaizo, as I hesitantly leveled out over a grass strip much shorter than I was used to. “Don’t overthink it.” In the flare, I tried my best to pretend that the Top Cub’s main wheels weren’t actually there, per Damian’s coaching, but it’s not that easy to ignore 31-inch tundra tires. Easing the stick back, I focused on the tailwheel instead. After a dance between altitude, airspeed and imagination, we touched down on all three wheels. But before I could even exhale—“Rudder, rudder, rudder!” exclaimed my instructor. “Stay alive on the rudder.” Although we were earthbound, the landing was far from over. Small jabs—playful yet authoritative—on the rudder pedals kept our yellow beauty pointed in the same direction we were moving. Slowing down, small inputs became large ones, and we rolled to a stop on the bumpy grass.



Learn To Fly Kit