Plane & Pilot
Monday, March 1, 2004

Learn To Fly!


Flight Training Adventure Camps offers a unique and exciting opportunity for aspiring pilots


learn to flyLearning how to fly means, among other things, mastering the controls of an airplane, understanding weather theory and unraveling the mysteries of aerodynamics—all of which can be studied at a local airport. That is an adventure in itself. But what if that process were taken one step further? Imagine, for instance, the Wild West as your flight school. The airplane, your teacher. Here, the vast expanse of the West plays an integral part in your flight training. It’s a daring place where you sleep, breathe and eat aviation, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, where you can sleep underneath the wing of the plane you’re learning to fly and where all around you is some of the world’s most inspiring landscape. This is you learning to fly.
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learn to flyLearning how to fly means, among other things, mastering the controls of an airplane, understanding weather theory and unraveling the mysteries of aerodynamics—all of which can be studied at a local airport. That is an adventure in itself. But what if that process were taken one step further? Imagine, for instance, the Wild West as your flight school. The airplane, your teacher. Here, the vast expanse of the West plays an integral part in your flight training. It’s a daring place where you sleep, breathe and eat aviation, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, where you can sleep underneath the wing of the plane you’re learning to fly and where all around you is some of the world’s most inspiring landscape. This is you learning to fly.

At Flight Training Adventure Camps (FTAC): The Reality Flight School, this idyllic concept isn’t just a figment of the imagination. It’s real. It’s a unique school where the rigors of reality-based training truly meld with the adventure of flight.

A One-Of-A-Kind Concept

Getting A Demo Flight
Nothing makes committing to flight lessons easier than taking a half-hour demonstration ride with a certified flight instructor (CFI). A non-profit aviation-industry- sponsored group called Be A Pilot has arranged a special rate at hundreds of participating flight schools around the country. For $49, you can actually fly an airplane and get a taste of what your flight training will actually be like. For a demo ride at a flight school near you, log on to www.beapilot.com.

Established about a decade ago, FTAC’s private-pilot training program is designed for determined self-starters who embrace adventure, challenge and teamwork. Its sole purpose is to create a learning environment in which aspiring aviators can have fun by traveling and camping out for several weeks across the west—all while experiencing an intense flight-training curriculum that equals any other flight school anywhere. According to Dominik Strobel, FTAC’s founder, camp director and chief flight instructor, “At FTAC, we go places. It’s exciting all the time and we make it fun so that you can associate what you’ve learned with the fun memory that will always remind you of what you’ve learned. And we do all of that at FTAC by not only traveling, but also having an intense curriculum, flying everyday and experiencing all kinds of environments.”

The two-part, six-week course consists of a two-week base camp in which students learn all about the theories involving flight, otherwise known as groundschool. The second part consists of a four-week expedition across the Southwest where students actually learn to fly an airplane at different types of airports. The entire course costs $5,950 and includes instructor fees, 40 hours of flight time, books, supplies, food, exam fees, and base- and tour-camp expenses—quite an inexpensive package, considering the valuable 24/7 flight training it offers. The pilot’s license that students can receive from FTAC is the same one that the FAA issues to every successful flight student, but the experience can be wholly different.


Minimum Requirements For Learning To Fly
1 There is no minimum or maximum age to be a student pilot. However, you must be 16 years old before you’ll be allowed to fly the airplane by yourself (“solo”) and 17 years old in order to get your license.
2 You have to pass a basic medical exam prior to flying solo.
3 You must pass a written examination consisting of 60 multiple-choice questions.
4 The student must pass an oral and flight test administered by an FAA examiner.






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