Plane & Pilot
Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Risky Business


Little-known tools that can help make your next flight safer


Useful Resources
Aviation risk assessment can range from simple to complex, and there are many ways to use acronyms, mnemonic devices and other terms to use as risk evaluators. To keep pilots engaged, a simple approach seems to be the key, leaving all the serious number crunching and formulas to the experts. There are some excellent tools available to help pilots start engaging in risk assessments before their flights.
www.faa.gov/library/manuals/aviation/media/FAA-H-8083-2.pdf Probably one of the best and most useful starting points is the FAA's own "Risk Management Handbook." It's available free to all pilots through this link.
http://flash.aopa.org/asf/flightrisk/index.cfm AOPA's Air Safety Institute has an excellent online Flight Risk Evaluator that's easy to use, clear and very useful.­
www.faa.gov/training_testing/training/fits/guidance/media/
Pers%20Wx%20Risk%20Assessment%20Guide-V1.0.pdf
Once again, the FAA publishes a concise risk assessment tools workbook. Pay particular attention to the form on the last page. This is the best and most universal GA risk assessment form available—and it's free.
www.takeflightsandiego.com/documents/RiskManagement_000.pdf NAFI (National Association of Flight Instructors) offers a handy, one-page graphic to help pilots remember the basic concepts of human factors and risk assessment.
www.flight.org/blog/2010/11/30/our-talk-with-john-king-of-king-schools/ John King took part in an excellent podcast where he discusses his approach to aviation risk management.That podcast is available on this blog. A simple search on YouTube will also yield King's 2010 risk presentation from Sun 'n Fun.
www.kingschools.com/practical-risk-management.asp The King's Risk Assessment Program is one of the best $49 you'll ever spend. It's an excellent overview of the risk management process.




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