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Article: A Personal Journey

The green fields, most looking as if you could land a 747 on them, stretched off into the distance, where they became low, gently rolling hills. ...

Also labeled: Columns, Features

Article: From The Editor: Maverick Has the Ball

To commemorate the centennial of naval aviation, Plane & Pilot Publisher Mike McMann and I journeyed to Naval Air Station Lemoore. We spent our day with strike-fighter squadron VFA-122, at the controls of an F/A-18 simulator, on a hangar...

Article: The Thrill Of Solo

I'd like to say I remember my first solo experience as if it happened only yesterday, but in truth, yesterday was a long time ago, and the memory isn't that vivid. ...

Article: Safe Turnarounds

Over the years, I've made frequent mention of a controversial number: "safe turnaround altitude."

Article: The Ted Stevens Accident

The NTSB says cockpit recorders might have helped shed better light on exactly what happened in the accident in which former U.S.

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: Where Everybody Knows Your Name

The success of the long-running Cheers TV show, I’m convinced, came in no small part from the seductive lines in that great theme song that so well captured the spirit of the show.

Article: Oshkosh By Any Other Name

Yeah, I know: It’s officially AirVenture. But to a lot of folks, the name just hasn’t clicked.

Also labeled: Columns, Features

Article: When Airplanes Collide: Avoiding The Unexpected

It’s ironic that most general aviation pilots consider a possible engine failure as their greatest fear.

Article: From The Editor: A Pilot’s Pilot

More than 500,000 people and 10,000 airplanes took part in the annual aviation mecca that is EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wis.

Article: The Value Of Corporate Time

Back in November 2008, when the CEOs of Chrysler, Ford and General Motors flew to Washington to ask for a government bailout, congressmen made much of the fact that the executives had all used corporate jets for the trip.

Article: A Whole New Flying World

A fellow pilot once asked, "How long does it take to check out on skis?"

Article: Broken Brakes

Not too long ago, I was looking forward to an hour or so of poking holes in the sky in a Piper Cherokee 180.

Article: Pressure’s On...Or Is It?

It's 95 degrees, and sweat is dripping down my face. The box suddenly seems impossibly small.

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: Gag Reel

To help with my recent write-up on what's great about owning and flying LSA, I had the pleasure to jaw with several owners, from teachers to pleasure flyers. ...

Article: Critter Delays

Gulfstream Eight Charlie Charlie, go around. The airport is temporarily closed.

Also labeled: Columns, Features

Article: Piper Cub Heaven

On an overcast, humid June day, I top a high dike built to prevent the Susquehanna River from flooding William T. Piper Memorial airport.

Article: From The Editor: Over Water

It never seems to matter what headset I'm wearing—when I'm flying over a large stretch of water, I can hear every single sound that the engine makes. ...

Article: Should We Rely On GPS?

Ido some post-maintenance test flying for a Cessna 300/400 shop in Long Beach, and a month or so back, I got a call to fly a 421 just coming out of an annual inspection. ...

Article: Accepting A Bad Situation

While a pilot needs to evaluate the consequences of making any decision, he or she needs to know that revising a decision is likely to make a bad situation even worse. ...

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: Profiles In Vision, Randall Fishman

In 2007, a man no one in aviation had ever heard of walked onto the field at Oshkosh, strapped himself into a motorized hang-glider trike and took off. ...

Article: Aerial Recycling

For the last six months or so, every time we'd taxi out, my eyes would drift to one end of the jet ramp, and linger on a Falcon 10 that has been there for quite a while. ...

Also labeled: Features

Article: From The Editor: Moving On Up

As pilots, we're constantly looking to challenge ourselves and learn more about flying.

Also labeled: Features, People and Places

Article: Lightning!

Perhaps the most active thunderstorm area of the world is Darwin, Australia.

Article: Excellence In Execution

I've dedicated my entire adult life to the art form of air-show flying.

Article: Getting A Few Winks

Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt led the outcry of indignation when news broke that the lone controller on the overnight shift at Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington had fallen asleep

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: The “Stork” Flies Again

Weird, cool, authentic, bizarre, eccentric, spectacular: so begins my Adjective Hit Parade to describe the Criquet Storch.

Article: Aerodromes And Longevity

Have you ever stood around the airport or at a fly-in, looked at some of your higher-mileage friends, and realized that even the gray dogs in the crowd act and look 15 years younger than you know them to be?

Also labeled: Features

Article: From The Editor: When Weather Gets In The Way

Each cross-country flight is an adventure, but when things don't go as planned, it doesn't have to become a misadventure.

Article: Low Level By Columbia

What had begun as a simple, 4,500 nm, late-winter ferry flight in a capable airplane had deteriorated to an ignominious retreat.

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: Scoping The Numbers

Every year about this time, I like to catch up with Mike Adams, the ever-helpful Vice President of Underwriting at Avemco Insurance Company, to take a gander at LSA accident trends.