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Pilot Talk

Article: Lightning!

Perhaps the most active thunderstorm area of the world is Darwin, Australia.

Article: Excellence In Execution

I've dedicated my entire adult life to the art form of air-show flying.

Article: Getting A Few Winks

Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt led the outcry of indignation when news broke that the lone controller on the overnight shift at Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington had fallen asleep

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: The “Stork” Flies Again

Weird, cool, authentic, bizarre, eccentric, spectacular: so begins my Adjective Hit Parade to describe the Criquet Storch.

Article: Aerodromes And Longevity

Have you ever stood around the airport or at a fly-in, looked at some of your higher-mileage friends, and realized that even the gray dogs in the crowd act and look 15 years younger than you know them to be?

Also labeled: Features

Article: From The Editor: When Weather Gets In The Way

Each cross-country flight is an adventure, but when things don't go as planned, it doesn't have to become a misadventure.

Article: Low Level By Columbia

What had begun as a simple, 4,500 nm, late-winter ferry flight in a capable airplane had deteriorated to an ignominious retreat.

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: Scoping The Numbers

Every year about this time, I like to catch up with Mike Adams, the ever-helpful Vice President of Underwriting at Avemco Insurance Company, to take a gander at LSA accident trends.

Article: Destination Unclear

The little Piper PA-22 lifts off in a fraction of the runway at Council (K29), 60 miles east-northeast of Nome in western Alaska.

Article: Jack

We were somewhere in the middle of the desert heading for my daughter's when my cell phone rang.

Also labeled: Columns, Features

Article: Inspiration To Africa

During World War II, I was a ferry pilot, flying military aircraft for the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA).

Article: When Not To Go

There's a sign-in guestbook in the pilot's lounge at Avitat in Bangor, Maine, that contains the names and missions of most of the international ferry pilots who have come through here in the last 30 years.

Article: From The Editor: Cross-Country

No matter how much you love to fly, 14 hours of flight in one day is a long time. That's how long it took Cirrus pilot Matt Bergwall and me to return to California from Sun 'n Fun.

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: The Great LSA Tour, V. 1.0

"If the mountain won’t come to Muhammad,” goes the ancient saying, “then Muhammad must go to the mountain.”

Article: I Do It Because...

"I fly because it releases my mind from the tyranny of petty things." —Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Also labeled: Columns, Features

Article: Adding Air Bags And Harnesses In The Air

Prominent on its list of Most Wanted Safety Improvements for 2011 is an assessment by the NTSB that the FAA needs to speed up improvements to procedures and equipment in order to help eliminate runway incursions.

Article: Always A Student

Would today be the day? I had been taking lessons for several weeks, and I knew that one day soon, my instructor Andy would get out of the airplane, and let me fly solo. I had even worn a special T-shirt for the last three lessons, with the hope that...

Article: From The Editor: Super Owner

Michelle Kole wasn’t sure what kind of airplane she wanted to own.

Article: There’s No Such Thing As Tailwinds

I know what some of you may be thinking. Bill Cox has finally gone off his rocker.

Article: From Spitfires To Mosquitoes

During World War II, I was a ferry pilot, flying military aircraft for the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA).

Article: Pilot Outlook 2010-2029: A Shortage Looms

Like the pendulum on a giant grandfather clock, the availability of aviation jobs goes back and forth in giant, lazy swings.

Article: Cub Butt

The contradictions between the Cirrus and my normal ride couldn’t have been more extreme if I had been in the space shuttle.

Also labeled: Columns, Features

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: Flight Of The Navigator

It’s the Babe Ruth of airplanes, the home-run standard against which we measure and judge all other airplanes whose company we’ll ever have the pleasure to keep.

Article: Close Calls On The Runways

Prominent on its list of Most Wanted Safety Improvements for 2011 is an assessment by the NTSB that the FAA needs to speed up improvements to procedures and equipment in order to help eliminate runway incursions.

Article: Canada By Cub

I’m the kind of guy who’s not scared to try new things. When I would fly my RC plane, I always thought how nice it would be to sit behind the controls and have freedom. ...

Article: Flight Recorder For The Little Guy

I like to think pilots read accident reports out of a sense of self-preservation rather than ghoulish curiosity.

Article: From Mountains To Deserts

With massive tundra tires, a welded tubular steel fuselage frame and seating for five, the tailwheel version of Expedition Aircraft’s bushplane lives up to its formidable name: Bigfoot.

Article: There And Back

I had long aspired to circumnavigate Australia, but time and opportunity had proved evasive until recently.

Article: Midair Over The Hudson

As a result of its investigation of the August 8, 2009, midair collision over the Hudson River, the NTSB says it’s time for the FAA to improve the information it offers to pilots about avoiding collisions.

Article: Light-Sport Chronicles: 50 Years To Solo

It’s the Babe Ruth of airplanes, the home-run standard against which we measure and judge all other airplanes whose company we’ll ever have the pleasure to keep. ...