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Video: So Hard To Watch: Cessna 210 Crashes: Pilot Posts Video Of It.

Warning: This video could be hard to watch. Everyone survived with minor-to-serious injuries. But the whole thing might be upsetting. It was to us.

A screen shot of the Mikesell Family Cessna 210 crash.
A screen shot of the Mikesell Family Cessna 210 crash.

Watching other people crashing in planes is always hard. In some cases, you’re just glad you weren’t there and all you can do is wish them luck. In others, you really wish you had been there, because you would have done things differently.

This one was bad. Here’s the background. At some time before noon on August 7, 2020, a Turbo Cessna 210 took off from Roosevelt, Utah, for a fair-weather daytime flight. There were five aboard, the Private rated pilot and four passengers. At just before noon high elevation. According to the NTSB, the plane’s last track point on the ADS-B track was at just lower than 12,000 feet.

The pilot reported that the engine stopped producing useful thrust, and he decided to fly down a canyon where there appeared to be landable terrain in a canyon between the steep mountainous peaks. The plane crashed minutes later as the pilot was trying to land. The stall warning horn is going nearly nonstop for the last 30 seconds of the flight, and the pilot reported that both gear and flaps were down. The plane appeared to go out of control when it was still an estimated hundred feet in the air but over landable terrain.

From seeing the wreckage, you wouldn’t guess that anyone survived the crash, but they all did. Two received serious injuries and three others had minor injuries. There was no fire at the crash site, and that might have saved lives.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, no investigators traveled to the scene of the accident, though the plane’s wreckage was moved to a secure location, the NTSB said, so they could examine it at a later date.

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