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Article: Aviation’s “Little” Emergencies

I had just departed Long Beach, Calif., in a Bellanca Viking, headed for the Reno Air Races, when black oil began flowing out of the cowling and onto the windshield. ...

Article: Never Run It Dry

It was the Christmas holiday, and I was on my way back from the Bahamas to Venice, Fla.

Article: 30 Things Not To Do In The Pattern

So much of aviation education is built around doing things right.

Article: Sharing The Sky

Although birds will take evasive action to avoid us, and lights can make us more conspicuous, there are times when their and our best efforts aren't good enough. ...

Article: Helpful Suggestions

Aviation seems to promote camaraderie among many of those who relish being part of this unique affinity group.

Article: Setting The Selector

If you've flown a variety of aircraft, you know that some designers decided to make it awfully difficult to see for sure which fuel tank or tanks you've selected. ...

Article: Drinking, Driving And Flying

When FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt resigned after being arrested by police in Fairfax City, Va., on a drunk-driving charge, some of my pilot acquaintances were quick to express astonishment at the irony of Babbitt himself likely having to face the...

Article: How Low Should You Go?

The indiscretions of youth. It's all too easy to examine stupid pilot tricks and dismiss them as functions of immaturity.

Article: Combating Crosswinds

Neither the wind given to you by the tower, nor that shown on a mid-field wind sock, is likely to be what you actually experience when landing. ...

Article: Weather Avoidance: Back To Basics

It's one of the great paradoxes in aviation that one of the biggest killers of pilots —weather—is one of the least understood and least taught subjects in primary flight instruction.

Article: May I See Your Driver’s License?

Others believe the resources the FAA devotes to medical certification could be put to better use elsewhere.

Article: Fire In Front

According to a search of NTSB data, in 2010, there were only four general aviation fixed-wing accidents investigated that involved in-flight engine compartment fires. ...

Article: Winter Flying Tips

Winter is as inevitable as aging, and for pilots who live in or fly to the northern latitudes, every winter will present significant challenges.

Article: Angle Of The Wing

I was introduced to an angle-of-attack indicator back in the early '80s. I was ferrying a V35B Bonanza from Atlanta, Georgia to Palo Alto, Calif., where it was to be fitted with one of Victor Aviation's balanced, blueprinted, Black Edition engines. ...

Article: Getting A Few Winks

Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt led the outcry of indignation when news broke that the lone controller on the overnight shift at Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington had fallen asleep

Article: How Tight Is Tight?

Prominent on its list of Most Wanted Safety Improvements for 2011 is an assessment by the NTSB that the FAA needs to speed up improvements to procedures and equipment in order to help eliminate runway incursions.

Article: Adding Air Bags And Harnesses In The Air

Prominent on its list of Most Wanted Safety Improvements for 2011 is an assessment by the NTSB that the FAA needs to speed up improvements to procedures and equipment in order to help eliminate runway incursions.

Article: Perfect Your Approaches

One of the most basic tenets of journalism is that we're all either the beneficiaries or the victims of our sources.

Article: Close Calls On The Runways

Prominent on its list of Most Wanted Safety Improvements for 2011 is an assessment by the NTSB that the FAA needs to speed up improvements to procedures and equipment in order to help eliminate runway incursions.

Article: Aerial Phobias

All of us have things in our lives that make us uncomfortable, sometimes to the point of terrorizing us. As kids, it’s what’s hiding under the bed. ...

Article: Stop Squeezing Them In

Remember the circus act in which a dozen clowns get out of the smallest car you’ve ever seen drive into the center ring?

Article: The Crosswind Component

Ensuring that there’s a safety margin in everything we do is fundamental to aviation accident avoidance.

Article: From Russia With Love

The Yak 50 is a single-engine, single-seat, low-wing, semi-retractable, conventional-gear aerobatic aircraft designed in 1973 by the Yakovlev Design Bureau in Russia. It’s an honest, friendly airplane—if somewhat extraordinary because of its country of...

Article: An Aviator’s Best Friend

Fifty years ago, I stood at the edge of space and jumped. This year, Felix Baumgartner of Austria plans to make a jump from the edge of space, but from a height that’s 20,000 feet higher—an altitude from which no human has ever successfully completed a...

Article: Analyzing Pilot Performance

NTSB investigators were able to assemble plenty of data to reconstruct what happened on board the Colgan Air Bombardier DHC-8-400 that crashed at Clarence Center, N.Y., on February 12, 2009.

Article: Recognizing You’re In Trouble

One of the most important skills for pilots to possess is the ability to recognize when they’re falling behind in an unfolding scenario. Frequently, pilots who fall too far behind experience accidents and are immortalized in NTSB accident reports.

Article: Safety’s Ideal World

In an ideal world, once the probable cause of an accident is identified, there never will be an accident like it again.

Article: SolidFX FX10

For years, U.S. instrument pilots have had a choice between charts from the FAA’s National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) and from Jeppesen, the overwhelming choice among commercial pilots.

Article: Getting Ready For NextGen

Recently, NTSB Chairman Deborah A. P. Hersman issued a warning that those in the government and aviation industry who are enamored of the planned Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) should get their heads out of the clouds and realize...

Article: The Common Thread

You may not think that “learning to fly” and “mountain flying” fit well in the same sentence, but I urge you to reconsider.